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Family History Photo – Three

Since I've hit both of my maternal grandparents, it's time to show off my paternal side. Above is my paternal grandmother. I'm guessing she was about two years old or so. Her mother had died in the 1918 flu epidemic, so she was raised by her father, who remarried about five years later.
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Family History Photo – Two

To accompany my photo from yesterday of my grandmother as a little girl along with her siblings, today I offer a photo of my grandfather as a little boy, with his siblings plus parents.
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Family History Photo – One

I have a plethora of family history items in storage tubs that I haven't had the time to archive yet, but I'm fortunate to also have plenty of digitized photos of my family on both sides. I treasure these photos, especially the ones of the family members that I knew. Road trips to visit family were a frequent activity my whole life, so I knew much of my extended family. I thought I'd share some...
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Geek Mom: We’re Big in Japan

The Geek Mom book is now being published in Japan. In Japanese. With our words (except translated into Japanese) and Dave Perillo's illustrations. His awesomely fantastic illustrations are why, I think, we sold the rights in Japan. They are so cute.
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Vi Hart: Geek Math Hero

Unless you've been living under a rock, if you're in the geek world, you know who Vi Hart is. But just in case you aren't already aware, she's a Geek Math Hero, to me and to the rest of my family. Her videos on hexaflexagons and twelve tone music, among others, have enthralled us and inspired us to dig further into the awesome world of math.
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Marimekko Celebrates 50 Years of Unikko

I discovered the Finnish design company Marimekko years ago, finding their gorgeous floral Unikko design, but didn't realize what it was at the time. I just loved the style and colors. Once the internet came up, and fancy things like "search terms" were for more than just database administrators, I was able to find more about it. Unfortunately, their products (usually fabric) were still too expensive for underemployed me.
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Isolated For 40 Years

Imagine, my whole life (as I am 40 years old at present), isolated from the outside world, knowing only five other people, ever.
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Platonic Love: Playing With Solids

Platonic solids are well known in the mathematic world. But now some mathematicians are re-evaluating some three-dimensional solids (I know, that's redundant) and believe they belong to a whole new class of solids.
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Gratitude

Here's a replay of something I wrote back on 12-12-12, 12 things for which I was/am grateful.
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Cutaway of the Saturn V Rocket

Above is the glorious Saturn V rocket, the one that took men to the moon during the Apollo program, the one that launched Skylab into orbit around the Earth, less than a month after I was born. It was a useful, consumable rocket used from 1966-1973.
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Sir David Attenborough Is the Man

I love how Sir David Attenborough can poke fun at himself. Here he is, narrating a bit of Olympic curling during a match between the U.S. and Great Britain.
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Weird Books: Codex Seraphinianus

I like weird things. I like weird people. Always have, always will. I was a huge fan of Salvador Dalí when I was a kid. I still appreciate his work. I don't believe Antoni Gaudí's work is gaudy (see what I did there?). But this book is weird. Really weird. It goes beyond Dalí and Gaudí to include the grotesque.
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Breastfeeding: Why Does it Weird Some People Out?

Biologically, breastfeeding is how you feed your baby. Procedure: Have baby. Baby feeds from the breast, first on colostrum and then, about three days later, on breast milk. It's always the right temperature, it's always available, and the body produces the right amount. Simple, yes?
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Sojourner Truth: “Ain’t I A Woman?”

I knew of Sojourner Truth long ago. At least in college, if not earlier. I took more than one women's history class, and various women's conventions would come up in such classes. Women's rights—including property, voting, and other kinds of rights—are a big topic in women's history. And while there are many amazing, strong, resourceful women in history, Sojourner Truth was magnificent.
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The Periodic Table of Storytelling

I found this table a few days ago, and was quite taken with it. There is a lot to storytelling that I don't quite comprehend, even after being forced to read Joseph Campbell's The Power of Myth in college.
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Useful Resources 2 – iCivics.org

iCivics.org is a non-profit organization that was started by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. It is designed for classrooms, but is quite easy to use for homeschooling. It is filled with printable lesson plans, research quests, and extremely well done games. And not games where the learning is secondary to the game play. The games include activities such as deciding how to set up the federal budget, or which side to decide for in a Supreme...
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Great, Good, Very: Writing Traps to Avoid

When you write for a living, you find yourself falling into ruts, using the same words over and over, stringing the same phrases together in different ways to say different kinds of things. I'm no different. (And, apparently, I use the word "different" far too often.) But there are some words that we should all try to avoid using altogether.
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Why Are We Defined By Our Deaths?

Yesterday, Philip Seymour Hoffman died. I hadn't seen too many of his movies, but I adored him in State and Main, and knew him to be a most excellent actor in addition. His death was possibly of a drug overdose, and if that's the case, he'll always be known as having died of a drug overdose, of it being a tragedy, and a genius who didn't get to perform his craft long enough.
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